MedicalConspiracies- Potassium Iodide
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Read the link below that I pasted..plus you must add potassium rich foods to your diet

http://www.buzzle.com/articles/potassium-rich-foods-list-of-foods-high-in-potassium.html


as you will see from this link below it is possible to do this without taking the man made potassium Iodate


http://www.radiationdetox.com/depleted-uranium-detox.htm

How to Detox Your Body of Depleted Uranium Residues, the Effects of Radiation, and Radioactive Contamination



It's sad but true that there are thousands of scientific references and medical studies out there on the fact that radiation and radioactivity can harm you, yet despite millions of dollars spent by the government to study radiation, virtually nothing is available about a detoxification diet or nutritional supplements you might use if you are exposed to radioactive contamination.

Here's some of the information we do know from the only book in the world on the topic. Keep this information in the back of your mind as it may one day help save you or someone you know.

Most people are aware taking potassium iodide (KI) or potassium iodate (KIO3) viagra cialis online pharmacy pharmacy will help block your thyroid gland from absorbing radioactive iodine should there ever be a dirty bomb explosion or nuclear power plant mishap such as the Three Mile Island incident. In 1999, another such accident happened in Tokaimura, Japan where several individuals died from radiation exposure in a fuel processing facility.

What people don't recognize is that potassium iodide or iodate tablets only protect the thyroid gland and do not provide protection from any other radiation exposure, so taking them should not give you a false sense of security. It's important to detox your body after radioactive exposure!

One question is, what do you do if KI or KIO3 tablets aren't available during an emergency? Interestingly enough, according to research by Ken Miller, health physicist at the Hershey Medical Center, he found that an adult could get a blocking dose of stable iodine by painting 8 ml of a 2 percent tincture of Iodine on the abdomen or forearm approximately 2 hours prior to I-131 contamination. Potassium iodine tablets are best, but if they're not available this is the next best thing.

An entirely different problem arises after you've been exposed to radioactive contamination because now you have to get rid of any radioactive particles you may have ingested through the air you breathed, water you drank, or food you ate. Some people suggest Epson salt, Clorox or clay baths to remove any residues on your skin and to leach out any heavy metals you may have absorbed, but the big worry is internal contamination. To gain some insights into what to do, we have to turn to the story of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki.

At the time of the atomic bombing, Tatsuichiro Akizuki, M.D. was Director of the Department of Internal Medicine at St. Francis's Hospital in Nagasaki and he fed his staff and patients a strict diet of brown rice, miso and tamari soy soup, wakame, kombu and other seaweed, Hokkaido pumpkin, and sea salt. He also prohibited the consumption of sugar and sweets since they suppress the immune system.

By imposing this diet on his staff and patients, no one succumbed to radiation poisoning whereas the occupants of hospitals located much further away from the blast incident suffered severe radiation fatalities.

Much of this positive result has to do with the fact that the sea vegetables contain substances that bind radioactive particles and escort them out of the body. This is why seaweed sales usually skyrocket after radiation disasters, and why various seaweeds and algae are typically used to treat radiation victims.

In Chernobyl, for instance, spirulina was used to help save many children from radiation poisoning. By taking 5 grams of spirulina a day for 45 days, the Institute of Radiation Medicine in Minsk even proved that children on this protocol experienced enhanced immune systems, T-cell counts and reduced radioactivity. Israeli scientists have since treated Chernobyl children with doses of natural beta carotene from Dunaliella algae and proved that it helped normalize their blood chemistry. Chlorella algae, a known immune system builder and heavy metal detoxifier, has also shown radioprotective effects. Because they bind heavy metals, algae should therefore be consumed after exposure to any type of radioactive contamination.

In 1968 a group of Canadian researchers at McGill University of Montreal, headed by Dr. Stanley Skoryna, actually set out to devise a method to counteract the effects of nuclear fallout. The key finding from their studies was that sea vegetables contained a polysaccharide substance, called sodium alginate, which selectively bound radioactive strontium and eliminated it from the body.

Sodium alginate is found in many seaweeds, especially kelp, and since that time the Russians have been seriously researching the use of their own kelps from Vladivlostok, from which they have isolated the polysaccharide U-Fucoidan, which is another radioactive detoxifier. Because miso soup was so effective in helping prevent radiation sickness, the Japanese have also done research identifying the presence of an active ingredient called zybicolin, discovered in 1972, which acts as a binding agent to also detoxify and eliminate radioactive elements (such as strontium) and other pollutants from the body.

The kelps and algaes aren't the only natural foods with radio-detoxifying effects. In terms of fluids to drink, black and green tea have shown "radioprotective effects" whether consumed either before or after exposure to radiation. This anti-radiation effect was observed in several Japanese studies, and studies from China also suggest that the ingredients in tea are radioactive antagonists.

In short, after any sort of radioactive exposure you want to be eating seaweeds and algaes along with almost any type of commercial heavy metal chelating formula to bind radioactive particles and help escort them out of the body. Whether you're worried about depleted uranium, plutonium or other isotopes, this is the wise thing to do which can possibly help, and certainly won't hurt. Many nutritional supplements have been developed for the purpose of detoxifying heavy metals, most of which contain the algaes and plant fibers and other binding substances.

Basically, an anti-radiation diet should focus on the following foods:

· Miso soup
· Spirulina, chlorella and the algaes (kelp, etc.)
· Brassica vegetables and high beta carotene vegetables
· Beans and lentils
· Potassium, calcium and mineral rich foods
· High nucleotide content foods to assist in cellular repair including spirulina, chlorella, algae, yeast, sardines, liver, anchovies and mackerel
· Cod liver oil and olive oil
· Avoid sugars and sweets and wheat
· A good multivitamin/multimineral supplement


Yet another benefit of the sea vegetables rarely discussed is their high mineral content, which is a bonus in the case of radioactive exposure. Consuming natural iodine, such as in the seaweeds, helps prevent the uptake of iodine-131 while iron inhibits the absorption of plutonium-238 and plutonium-239. Vitamin B-12 inhibits cobalt-60 uptake (used in nuclear medicine), zinc inhibits zinc-65 uptake and sulfur is preventative for sulfur-35 (a product of nuclear reactors) incorporation by the body.

Since nuclear workers are potentially exposed to radioactive sulfur, this means that workers in the atomic power industry need a higher content of sulfur in their diet. MSM supplements provide a source of dietary sulfur, but thiol supplements such as cysteine, lipoic acid and glutathione serve double-duty in this area because they help detoxify the body and attack all sorts of other health problems as well.

The immune system is usually hit hard after radiation exposure, and a number of steps can be taken to help prevent opportunistic infections after a radioactive incident. Though the full dimensions of the protective mechanism is still unknown, Siberian ginseng is one form of ginseng that exerts a definite radioprotective effect and has been demonstrated to lessen the side effects of radiation. It was widely distributed by the Soviet Union to those exposed Chernobyl radiation and is commonly used to help cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.

Consuming Reishi mushrooms is another proven way to bolster your immune system after radiation exposure and helps reduce the damage from radiation. It's been used to decrease radiation sickness in animals and help them recover faster after potentially deadly exposure.

Panax ginseng has prevented hemorrhaging after radiation exposure, prevents bone marrow death and stimulates blood cell formation, so it's another supplement to add to one's protocol. In short, yeasts, beta glucans, bee pollen and various forms of ginseng have all been shown to bolster the immune system after radiation incidents. In terms of radiation burns, aloe vera has a proven ability to treat serious radiation burns and offers other radioprotective effects, and can easily be grown in your house.

The amino acid L-Glutamine can be used to help repair the intestine in case of the gastrointestinal syndrome usually suffered due to radiation exposure, and a variety of substances can help rebuild blood cells to prevent hematopoietic syndrome. Those particular foods include beet juice, liver extract, spleen extract, and shark alkyglycerols. Most oncologists don't know that shark liver oil, with alkyglycerols, can help platelet counts rebound in days.

Depleted uranium is currently in the journalistic spotlight because US weapons are made from this material, and after being fired leave a legacy of depleted uranium dust in the environment, which anyone can absorb. Because the kidneys are usually the first organs to show chemical damage upon uranium exposure, military manuals suggest doses or infusions of sodium bicarbonate to help alkalinize the urine if this happens. This makes the uranyl ion less kidney-toxic and promotes excretion of the nontoxic uranium carbonate complex.

In areas contaminated by depleted uranium dusts, it therefore makes sense to switch to drinking slightly alkaline water and to favor a non-acidic diet to assist in this detoxification. Any of the heavy metal detoxifiers, such as miso soup, chlorella, spirulina and seaweeds, are also commonsense warranted.

Another thing you can do is use homeopathics for radiation exposure. People commonly argue over whether homeopathics work or not, but if you assume the position that they produce no results whatsoever then you must also assume that they certainly won't hurt you, which means the only loss from using them is a few dollars. Frankly, there are countless cases and double-blind studies where homeopathic tinctures do provoke physical healing effects in the body. Therefore they are a viable adjunct treatment option. One homeopathic, in particular, is URANIUM NITRICUM (nitrate of uranium) which homeopaths suggest should be used in cases of depleted uranium exposure or uranium poisoning. Not just soldiers or civilians exposed to battlefield dusts, but uranium miners and radiation workers may find it quite useful.

While we've discussed just a few of the many supplements and protocols you can use to help detox the body of the lingering results of radioactive contamination, including the residues of depleted uranium, the last thing that might be of interest is that there is a plant that is a natural geiger counter. The spiderwort plant is so sensitive to changes in radiation levels (its petals change color upon exposure) that it's often used as a natural radiation detector (dosimeter), just as they use canaries in mines as detectors of poisonous gas. Some people like knowing that they have an ongoing monitoring system for radiation in the environment, and this is just another tip available in "How to Neutralize the Harmful Effects of Radiation or Radioactive Exposure."



Debbie Newhook
http://osnanaimo.org/

--- On Sun, 3/13/11, justmeint <justmeint@gmail.com> wrote:

From: justmeint <justmeint@gmail.com>
Subject: [Health_and_Healing] Potasium Iodide
To: Health_and_Healing@yahoogroups.com
Received: Sunday, March 13, 2011, 3:05 PM

 


I received an email today showing the POTENTIAL hazard of a nuclear power plant blast in Japan.... and where it/ the radiation would travel to. The gist was people need to have potassium iodide in their first aid kits.
 
Where do people stand (if we cannot take iodine).... and do you have any thoughts/information on this topic please.
 
here is what I received:

I Received this from a good friend who is a Calif. Highway Patrol Officer.
BillD

Not to alarm anyone, but does your emergency supply kit include Potasium Iodide? The FDA recommends Thyrosafe.
750 rads could be fatal.  This is not an official map but shows what the jet stream can carry since it blows over the pacific.

Also, check radiation levels at this site.


=



Viagra Concession Ends Strike
yexevole
Transit workers in Philadelphia, threatening to continue their strike for a raise in more than their salaries, have won a battle with the Southern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority to have most of their health care costs covered, including full-month prescriptions for online pharmacy and similar prescription medicines to treat erectile dysfunction (ED).

The leader of the transit workers, Jeff Laccid, explained it like this “look, if the train ain’t got enough power, how’s it gonna make in and out of the tunnel, ya know?” He continued, “Not that there’s anything wrong with me, but I got guys coming to me saying that they can blow through the ten-pill-a-month allowance in a long weekend. They’re telling me this is hard on their wives and girlfriends. The number of transit workers threatening to beat it if they don’t get their pills has swelled since the insurance plan took its hard stance.

The official healthcare provider for the transit authority, Dr. Ed Wiener, says that this was a perfect storm waiting to happen due to:

* More and more transit workers coming up on retirement age or crossing into retirement.
*Salaries and retirement accounts taking a huge financial hit, creating a load of stress.
*Most of the older workers taking other prescription drugs for diabetes and high blood pressure that affect their male performance.

“What this amounts to is a bulging population of men who have come to depend on that little blue pill, and who were initially told to make do with what they had. Some claimed it just wasn’t enough.”

The Transit Authority, though, wasn’t buying it. There are a few younger guys out there who were taking advantage of the program by forging prescriptions for the little blue pill--affectionately known in transit circles as the “pocket train,”--and then turning around and selling it at a much higher price to their senior co-workers who were too embarrassed to discuss their condition with their own doctors. “Let’s just say that there was more than bus passes and train tickets being sold out of the terminals,” said one insurance company spokesperson.

What does this newest concession say about the success of union negotiators in the public transit system? I’ll tell you,” said Laccid, “all that dickering back and forth paid off in a huge way. It’s not like we want to stick it to anyone, we just want a bigger package for our guys.”

Farmacia Cialis, Comprar Cialis, Cialis Online, Cialis
yexevole
Farmacia viagra, Comprar cialis, Cialis Online, Cialis


Artículo del cuerpo:
Cialis es un medicamento maravilloso tratamiento de la disfunción eréctil, sin embargo es necesario tener mucho cuidado antes de comprar en línea Cialis Cialis de Farmacia. Echemos un vistazo de cerca a algunos de sus efectos conocidos y precauciones.

• Se sabe que un número muy pequeño de hombres han perdido la visión después de tomar Cialis. Esto ocurre porque el flujo sanguíneo se bloquea el nervio óptico. Las personas que tienen cualquier tipo de problemas cardiacos, diabetes, presión arterial alta, colesterol alto o problemas en los ojos son más propensos a sufrir problemas de visión. Por lo tanto, se aconseja no tomar Cialis o si se solicita sólo después de consultar con un médico.

• Las personas que están bajo cualquier tipo de medicamentos (nitratos o bloqueadores alfa-drogas) no deben tomar Cialis. Esto se debe a la combinación de estos dos medicamentos puede resultar en súbita de la presión arterial, que puede conducir a un ataque al corazón o un derrame cerebral.

• Aunque Cialis puede tomarse con alcohol, la ingesta de una cantidad excesiva de alcohol debe ser evitado. Esto aumenta el riesgo de dolor de cabeza, mareos, aumento del ritmo cardíaco o presión arterial baja.

• Los hombres mayores de 65 años son más propensos a experimentar los efectos secundarios de Cialis. Ellos deben verificar con un médico para conocer la mejor dosis de este medicamento.

• A pesar de los malos efectos de Cialis no debe considerarse en las mujeres, en general se recomienda no ser tomado por mujeres.

• La toronja y el jugo de pomelo es probable que se entremezclan con Cialis. Su combinación puede dar lugar a efectos potencialmente adversos.

• A veces el uso de Cialis conduce a la erección raro que no desaparece. Esta condición se conoce como priapismo. Cualquiera de tales condiciones deben ser tratados tan pronto como sea posible y duradero el daño puede ocurrir en el pene.

• Recuerde siempre Cialis no es una cura para la disfunción eréctil. Además, no protege al hombre oa su pareja de enfermedades de transmisión sexual, incluido el VIH.

Fake Iran Encounter Simmed in '02, CO Pandemic X, + News
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Fake Iran Encounter Simmed in '02, CO Pandemic X, + News

Community plays out a devastating scenario in a tabletop exercise (CO)
http://www.montrosepress.com/articles/2008/01/14/news/doc478af4c796da5168636056.txt
From left, Montrose Memorial cheap cialis CEO Ken Platou, David Dreitlein, M.D., and Emergency Room Director Sharon Holbrook study what the chain of command would look like in the event of an outbreak of pandemic flu during a tabletop exercise at the hospital Wednesday. (Barton Glasser / Daily Press)

MONTROSE — “What if?” was the question local law, emergency and health officials faced last week during a pandemic tabletop exercise.Montrose County Health and Human Services collaborated with Montrose Memorial Hospital to present a devastating scenario involving the avian flu. The exercise was to test the readiness of important community entities including the police and sheriff departments, the hospital, health and human services, Montrose County and city, the fire department and school district.
“The outcome for us was to get the conversation started and get different players working together,” said Dr. Dick Gingery, MCHHS facilitator for the event. “We would all have to work together in this situation if it was a reality.”
Representatives from the different organization were given a packet that laid out a series of events which participants found daunting and overwhelming to their department.
The scenario started with an explosion at a chicken farm outside of Montrose. At the same time, there is “buzzing” in the community about the discovery of the avian flu virus in a chicken farm in Delta.
A pandemic is an outbreak of a disease that is prevalent over a whole county or the world.

Air Forces to launch relief exercises
http://www.guampdn.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080114/NEWS01/801140320/1002
Pacific Air Forces will launch its first-ever total force humanitarian assistance and disaster relief exercise, known as Pacific Lifeline, from three locations within the Hawaiian Islands, Jan. 20 through Feb. 9, according to a news release from the Air Force.
About 900 Department of Defense personnel will participate in the 13th Air Force-led exercise, which will train and integrate Air Force and Army active duty, Air National Guard and Reserve component forces to respond to a real-world humanitarian crisis or national disaster in the Pacific Region. Initial forces will begin prepositioning at Kona International Airport Jan.11 via U.S. Air Force transport aircraft.
"We live in a region were natural disasters occur, unfortunately, all too often, and Pacific Air Forces are postured and ready to respond quickly and effectively when the call for help comes in," said Lt. Gen. Loyd S. "Chip" Uttterback, 13th Air Force commander. "Pacific Lifeline is a terrific venue to exercise our ability to organize, plan, rapidly deploy and lead a joint force to provide disaster relief and humanitarian assistance anywhere in the Pacific theater."

Iran Encounter Grimly Echoes ’02 War Game
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/12/washington/12navy.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin
WASHINGTON — There is a reason American military officers express grim concern over the tactics used by Iranian sailors last weekend: a classified, $250 million war game in which small, agile speedboats swarmed a naval convoy to inflict devastating damage on more powerful warships.
In the days since the encounter with five Iranian patrol boats in the Strait of Hormuz, American officers have acknowledged that they have been studying anew the lessons from a startling simulation conducted in August 2002. In that war game, the Blue Team navy, representing the United States, lost 16 major warships — an aircraft carrier, cruisers and amphibious vessels — when they were sunk to the bottom of the Persian Gulf in an attack that included swarming tactics by enemy speedboats.
“The sheer numbers involved overloaded their ability, both mentally and electronically, to handle the attack,” said Lt. Gen. Paul K. Van Riper, a retired Marine Corps officer who served in the war game as commander of a Red Team force representing an unnamed Persian Gulf military. “The whole thing was over in 5, maybe 10 minutes.”

WorldView satellite delivers its first views of the world
http://www.lompocrecord.com/articles/2008/01/14/news/centralcoast/news04.txt
A high-resolution imaging satellite that launched in September from Vandenberg Air Force Base has delivered extremely detailed first pictures, according to DigitalGlobe, the spacecraft's owner-operator.
The firm released images from the WorldView-1 satellite, showing skyscrapers in Houston, Texas; the port of Yokohama, Japan; and an area around a traffic circle in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, while announcing that WorldView-1 has reached full operating capability for all customers.

Homeland Security proposes delayed Real ID rollout
http://www.news.com/8301-10784_3-9848924-7.html?tag=nefd.pulse

Russian missile cruiser near Malta
http://www.di-ve.com/Default.aspx?ID=72&Action=1&NewsID=49140&newscategory=37


India, China to hold 2nd military exercise this year: PM
http://www.hindustantimes.com/StoryPage/StoryPage.aspx?id=715466ec-6f22-4d53-a78d-fb810086b086&ParentID=3249e99e-8473-4433-8cd7-464efe5e749a&&Headline=India%2c+China+to+hold+2nd+military+exercise+this+year%3a+PM
India and China on Monday announced to hold their second joint military exercises this year and welcomed the "progress" in negotiations on the boundary issue.
Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Chinese counterpart Wen Jiabao during extensive talks agreed to substantially enhance economic engagement by stepping up bilateral trade target from $40 billion to $60 billion by 2010.
Building on the goodwill generated by the landmark handshake between the world's two powerful armies last month in Kumming in China, the two leaders decided to have a second military exercise in India.
"We have agreed to continue to deepening mutual understanding and trust between our armed forces and welcome the successful first exercise in Kumming," Singh said.

Doxylamine (dox il' a meen)
yexevole
Doxylamine (dox il' a meen)

Why is this purchase cialis prescribed?
Doxylamine is used in the short-term treatment of insomnia (difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep). Doxylamine is also used in combination with decongestants and other medications to relieve sneezing, runny nose, and nasal congestion caused by the common cold. Doxylamine should not be used to cause sleepiness in children. Doxylamine is in a class of medications called antihistamines. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms.

How should this cheap cialis be used?
Doxylamine comes as a tablet to take by mouth for sleep, and in combination with other medications as a liquid and liquid-filled capsule to treat symptoms of the common cold. When doxylamine is used to reduce difficulty falling asleep, it usually is taken 30 minutes before bedtime. When doxylamine is used to treat cold symptoms, it is usually taken every 4 to 6 hours. Follow the directions on the package label or on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take doxylamine exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor or directed on the package label.

Doxylamine comes alone and in combination with pain relievers, fever reducers, and cough suppressants, If you are choosing a product to treat cough or cold symptoms, ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice on which product is best for your symptoms. Check nonprescription cough and cold product labels carefully before using two or more products at the same time. These products may contain the same active ingredient(s) and taking them together could cause you to receive an overdose.

Nonprescription cough and cold combination products, including products that contain doxylamine, can cause serious side effects or death in young children. Do not give nonprescription products that contain doxylamine to children younger than 4 years of age. Ask a doctor before giving these products to children 4-12 years of age.

Cough and cold symptoms that get worse or that do not go away may be signs of a more serious condition. If you are taking doxylamine in combination with other medications to treat cough and cold symptoms, call your doctor if your symptoms worsen or if they last longer than 7 days.

If you are taking doxylamine to treat insomnia, you will probably become very sleepy soon after you take the medication and will remain sleepy for some time after you take the medication. Plan to remain asleep for 7 to 8 hours after taking the medication. If you get up too soon after taking doxylamine, you may be drowsy.

Doxylamine should only be used to treat insomnia for a short time. Call your doctor if you feel that you need to take doxylamine for longer than 2 weeks.

If you are using the liquid, do not use a household spoon to measure your dose. Use the measuring cup or spoon that came with the medication or use a spoon that is made especially for measuring medication.

Are there other uses for this medicine?
This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

  • Aldex® AN

  • Nighttime Sleep Aid® Tablets

  • Unisom® SleepTabs

  • Vicks® NyQuil® Cold & Flu Relief (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Dextromethorphan, and Doxylamine)

  • Vicks® NyQuil® Cold & Flu Symptom Relief Plus Vitamin C (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Dextromethorphan, and Doxylamine)

  • Vicks® NyQuil® Cough (as a combination product containing Dextromethorphan and Doxylamine)

  • Vicks® NyQuil® D (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Dextromethorphan, Doxylamine, and Pseudoephedrine)

  • Vicks® NyQuil® Sinus (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Doxylamine, and Phenylephrine)



What special precautions should I follow?


Before taking doxylamine,



  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to doxylamine or any other medications.

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: medications for colds, hay fever, or allergies; medications for depression; muscle relaxants; narcotic medications for pain; sedatives; sleep medications; and tranquilizers.

  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had asthma, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, or other breathing problems; glaucoma (a condition in which increased pressure in the eye can lead to gradual loss of vision); ulcers; difficulty urinating (due to an enlarged prostate gland); heart disease, high blood pressure, seizures,or an overactive thyroid gland.

  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking doxylamine, call your doctor.

  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking doxylamine.

  • you should know that this medication may make you drowsy. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.

  • remember that alcohol can add to the drowsiness caused by this medication. Avoid alcoholic beverages while you are taking this medication.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?
Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.





What side effects can this medication cause?
Doxylamine may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • dry mouth, nose, and throat

  • drowsiness

  • nausea

  • increased chest congestion

  • headache

  • excitement

  • nervousness



If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • vision problems

  • difficulty urinating



Doxylamine may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while you are taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].

What should I do if I forget to take a dose?
Doxylamine is usually taken as needed. If your doctor has told you to take doxylamine regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What should I do in case of overdose?
In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

What storage conditions are needed for this medication?
Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.

What other information should I know?
Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about doxylamine.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.





Important warning
FDA Intends to Remove Some Unapproved Cough, Cold, and Allergy Drugs from the Market

This safety alert does not apply to this medication, but only to some products which contain this medication. In addition, it is important that you know that there is not a problem with most of the products described in this medication monograph. And some drug companies may decide to seek full approval from the FDA so that they can continue marketing their products.

On March 2, 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a safety alert about certain unapproved prescription cough, cold, and allergy products containing this drug in combination with other drugs. These products are not currently approved by the FDA for safety, effectiveness, and quality. FDA asked drug companies to stop shipping most of these products for sale in the US within the next 6 months. Although some of these products have been marketed for many years, laws about what a company must prove to FDA for drug product approval have gotten tougher and increased enforcement of these laws is now taking place. The FDA took this action due to concerns about certain potential risks associated with use of these medications. These risks may include:



the possibility of improper use in infants and young children

potentially risky combinations of ingredients

patients receiving too much or too little of the medication because of problems with the way some ''timed-release'' products are made



If you are concerned that the prescription cough, cold, and allergy medication you are taking is not approved by the FDA, you should talk to your doctor or pharmacist. If the medication you are taking is not approved, your doctor can prescribe another prescription medication or your doctor or pharmacist can suggest an over-the-counter (OTC) cough, cold, and allergy product for your condition. There are many safe and effective alternative approved products that can be taken instead. Your doctor probably prescribed the medicine without knowing that FDA had not approved it. This is because it has been so difficult for doctors and pharmacists to find out that these products are unapproved. For additional information:



You can visit the FDA website (http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm244852.htm) for more information about this action to remove unapproved cough, cold, and allergy products from the market.

You can find a list of unapproved products by going to (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm245279.htm).

For information on how to dispose of unused products, go to http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm101653.htm.

Doxylamine (dox il' a meen)
yexevole
Doxylamine (dox il' a meen)

Why is this order cialis prescribed?
Doxylamine is used in the short-term treatment of insomnia (difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep). Doxylamine is also used in combination with decongestants and other medications to relieve sneezing, runny nose, and nasal congestion caused by the common cold. Doxylamine should not be used to cause sleepiness in children. Doxylamine is in a class of medications called antihistamines. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms.

How should this cialis be used?
Doxylamine comes as a tablet to take by mouth for sleep, and in combination with other medications as a liquid and liquid-filled capsule to treat symptoms of the common cold. When doxylamine is used to reduce difficulty falling asleep, it usually is taken 30 minutes before bedtime. When doxylamine is used to treat cold symptoms, it is usually taken every 4 to 6 hours. Follow the directions on the package label or on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take doxylamine exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor or directed on the package label.

Doxylamine comes alone and in combination with pain relievers, fever reducers, and cough suppressants, If you are choosing a product to treat cough or cold symptoms, ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice on which product is best for your symptoms. Check nonprescription cough and cold product labels carefully before using two or more products at the same time. These products may contain the same active ingredient(s) and taking them together could cause you to receive an overdose.

Nonprescription cough and cold combination products, including products that contain doxylamine, can cause serious side effects or death in young children. Do not give nonprescription products that contain doxylamine to children younger than 4 years of age. Ask a doctor before giving these products to children 4-12 years of age.

Cough and cold symptoms that get worse or that do not go away may be signs of a more serious condition. If you are taking doxylamine in combination with other medications to treat cough and cold symptoms, call your doctor if your symptoms worsen or if they last longer than 7 days.

If you are taking doxylamine to treat insomnia, you will probably become very sleepy soon after you take the medication and will remain sleepy for some time after you take the medication. Plan to remain asleep for 7 to 8 hours after taking the medication. If you get up too soon after taking doxylamine, you may be drowsy.

Doxylamine should only be used to treat insomnia for a short time. Call your doctor if you feel that you need to take doxylamine for longer than 2 weeks.

If you are using the liquid, do not use a household spoon to measure your dose. Use the measuring cup or spoon that came with the medication or use a spoon that is made especially for measuring medication.

Are there other uses for this medicine?
This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

  • Aldex® AN

  • Nighttime Sleep Aid® Tablets

  • Unisom® SleepTabs

  • Vicks® NyQuil® Cold & Flu Relief (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Dextromethorphan, and Doxylamine)

  • Vicks® NyQuil® Cold & Flu Symptom Relief Plus Vitamin C (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Dextromethorphan, and Doxylamine)

  • Vicks® NyQuil® Cough (as a combination product containing Dextromethorphan and Doxylamine)

  • Vicks® NyQuil® D (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Dextromethorphan, Doxylamine, and Pseudoephedrine)

  • Vicks® NyQuil® Sinus (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Doxylamine, and Phenylephrine)



What special precautions should I follow?


Before taking doxylamine,



  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to doxylamine or any other medications.

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: medications for colds, hay fever, or allergies; medications for depression; muscle relaxants; narcotic medications for pain; sedatives; sleep medications; and tranquilizers.

  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had asthma, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, or other breathing problems; glaucoma (a condition in which increased pressure in the eye can lead to gradual loss of vision); ulcers; difficulty urinating (due to an enlarged prostate gland); heart disease, high blood pressure, seizures,or an overactive thyroid gland.

  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking doxylamine, call your doctor.

  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking doxylamine.

  • you should know that this medication may make you drowsy. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.

  • remember that alcohol can add to the drowsiness caused by this medication. Avoid alcoholic beverages while you are taking this medication.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?
Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.





What side effects can this medication cause?
Doxylamine may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • dry mouth, nose, and throat

  • drowsiness

  • nausea

  • increased chest congestion

  • headache

  • excitement

  • nervousness



If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • vision problems

  • difficulty urinating



Doxylamine may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while you are taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].

What should I do if I forget to take a dose?
Doxylamine is usually taken as needed. If your doctor has told you to take doxylamine regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What should I do in case of overdose?
In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

What storage conditions are needed for this medication?
Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.

What other information should I know?
Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about doxylamine.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.





Important warning
FDA Intends to Remove Some Unapproved Cough, Cold, and Allergy Drugs from the Market

This safety alert does not apply to this medication, but only to some products which contain this medication. In addition, it is important that you know that there is not a problem with most of the products described in this medication monograph. And some drug companies may decide to seek full approval from the FDA so that they can continue marketing their products.

On March 2, 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a safety alert about certain unapproved prescription cough, cold, and allergy products containing this drug in combination with other drugs. These products are not currently approved by the FDA for safety, effectiveness, and quality. FDA asked drug companies to stop shipping most of these products for sale in the US within the next 6 months. Although some of these products have been marketed for many years, laws about what a company must prove to FDA for drug product approval have gotten tougher and increased enforcement of these laws is now taking place. The FDA took this action due to concerns about certain potential risks associated with use of these medications. These risks may include:



the possibility of improper use in infants and young children

potentially risky combinations of ingredients

patients receiving too much or too little of the medication because of problems with the way some ''timed-release'' products are made



If you are concerned that the prescription cough, cold, and allergy medication you are taking is not approved by the FDA, you should talk to your doctor or pharmacist. If the medication you are taking is not approved, your doctor can prescribe another prescription medication or your doctor or pharmacist can suggest an over-the-counter (OTC) cough, cold, and allergy product for your condition. There are many safe and effective alternative approved products that can be taken instead. Your doctor probably prescribed the medicine without knowing that FDA had not approved it. This is because it has been so difficult for doctors and pharmacists to find out that these products are unapproved. For additional information:



You can visit the FDA website (http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm244852.htm) for more information about this action to remove unapproved cough, cold, and allergy products from the market.

You can find a list of unapproved products by going to (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm245279.htm).

For information on how to dispose of unused products, go to http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm101653.htm.

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